9 April 2017

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This view, from Merdeka Square, shows examples of the dull office buildings that stretch up over Kuala Lumpur, their blandness shown up here, by the Sultan Abdul Samad Building. Completed in 1897, it’s an example of Moorish or Indo-Saracenic style. Two other major landmarks of the city, the KL Tower and the Petronas Twin Towers, also share the view, along with the cranes. There is no escape from construction here, either new, repair or renovation, one doesn’t get far without coming across some sort of building site.

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The Sultan Abdul Samad Building faces Merdeka Square, a huge grassed area in the centre of the city. At the south of the square, a 100 metre-high flagpole marks the spot where the Malayan Flag was raised on August 31, 1957, signifying the independence of the country from British rule.  Independence day celebrations occur here every year. Across from the square, the national Textile Museum is located in a beautiful Mogul-style building,  previously occupied and used by the state railway.

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Textile museum

The Old Kuala Lumpur railway station, completed in 1910, in a Mogul or Indo-Saracenic style, is still in use today, although it is not the main station of the city now.

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Old KL railway station

 

Across the road from the station is the Malaya Railway Administration Building.

Next to the administration building, is the National Mosque. Built in 1965, it’s one of Southeast Asia’s largest mosques. The main dome is designed in the shape of an 18-point star to represent the 13 states of Malaysia and the five central Pillars of Islam, and has the appearance of a partly opened umbrella roof which symbolises the aspirations of an independent nation. The roof is bright turquoise, just seen in the only decent photo I could get of it.

Masjid Jamek is one of the oldest mosques in Malaysia. This was also the first brick mosque in Malaysia when it was completed in 1907 and was the city’s centre of Islamic worship until the opening of the National Mosque in 1965. Unfortunately when I visited it, they were doing renovations, so I could only get a couple of photos.

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Masjid Jamek

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